Here’s what your skin says about your health

Although we tend to focus on our hair and face when we think about skincare, the truth is that we need to devote just as much attention to the health of our entire body skin.

Your skin is your body’s largest organ and it can tell you a lot about your overall health. Although we tend to focus on our hair and face when we think about skincare, the truth is that we need to devote just as much attention to the health of our entire body skin. It’s easy to look good when it comes to makeup and hair, but ensuring that all parts of your body are healthy can be more difficult. Fortunately, Some telltale signs can help you determine if something is wrong with your skin:

Dry skin

According to Mayo Clinicdry skin is usually caused by water loss or dehydration. If you consume plenty of water, your skin will be hydrated and smooth. You can also have a underlying health condition that causes dryness, such as diabetes, so if you notice a sudden skin change, see your doctor.

oily skin

It’s not all bad news: if you’re lucky enough to have this type of complexion, you’ll appreciate the fact that your pores are less visible and there’s no need for heavy foundation. But if you have very oily skin and find yourself constantly mopping up shine, see a dermatologist as it could be triggered by things like genetics, hormones, or diet depending on your skin. Health Line.

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oily skin Catherine Falls Commercial

Flaky skin

If you scratch skin regularly, you might be wondering what makes your skin look so flaky — dryness being a possibility, eczema and psoriasis among others, says Cleveland Clinic.

Exposure to weather or chemicals can also contribute, especially if you live in a cold climate or spend all day working with machinery that emits fumes into the air around it. (like hair salons). If this sounds familiar, remember to use moisturizer often when outdoors and always wear gloves when working around machinery!

Irritated red skin

Facial flushing is a common sign of inflammation.Inflammation is often caused by allergies, stress and/or food sensitivities. all of these can cause skin irritation that results in redness. If you still have red cheeks (or nose), it’s time to see a doctor.

A simple blood test can determine if you have a allergy or sensitivity to certain foods like peanuts, soy, or eggs which could be causing your symptoms. It is also important to rule out other possible causes such as rosacea or acne rosacea before making a diagnosis based on what your face looks like all by itself!

Disclaimer: The content of this article: text, graphics, images and other content, is strictly for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be used as a substitute for professional medical diagnosis, advice or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have related to or about a medical condition.

Sources used:

Mayo Clinic: Dry Skin

Healthline: 7 causes of oily skin

Cleveland Clinic: Skin peeling

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