‘Avatar 2’ was 100% worth the 12-year wait

Avatar: The Waterway Key Art And Stills

Source: Courtesy / 20th Century Studios

SPOILER NOTICE:

The following movie review does not contain direct spoilers for the film Avatar: the way of water, however, general information regarding the plot, characters, key climaxes, and events of the original 2009 film that directly relate to the events of the 2022 sequel will be discussed extensively.
Please read at your own discretion, or after viewing Avatar: The Way of the Water in theatres.

In 2009, acclaimed director James Cameron took us to the mid-22nd century through Pandora, a majestic place where an indigenous humanoid species known as the Na’vi exists. The aptly titled hit sci-fi film Avatarwould go on to become the highest-grossing film of all time, still holding that title to this day – sorry, End of Game!

The hype for a sequel to Avatar has been on the minds of many moviegoers for nearly 12 years now. Well, after recently attending a first screening of the official follow-up film, Avatar: The Way of the Waterwe’re here to tell you it was worth waiting over a decade to see!

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Everything that has done Avatar such a visual masterpiece is reproduced in The water path with even more technological advancements. We saw the film in an enhanced Dolby Cinema with Dolby Vision 3D — glasses included! – which really helped make the experience even more immersive. Underwater scenes, and there’s a plot of them, come out with such luminosity that one has the impression of being under water with them. Fish swimming close to your face, whales making earth-shattering sounds, explosions of the climactic big fight – it all comes to life with the Dolby Cinema experience.

Avatar: The Waterway Key Art And Stills

Source: Courtesy / 20th Century Studios

Avatar: The Waterway Key Art And Stills

Source: Courtesy / 20th Century Studios

Avatar: The Waterway Key Art And Stills

Source: Courtesy / 20th Century Studios

As the end of Avatar suggests that Sully (Sam Worthington) is alive, well, and reborn full-time as a Na’vi Avatar. He and Neytiri (Zoe Saldaña) raise their own tribe within a village of their people before a familiar enemy arrives and threatens their decade-long peace of mind.

Colonel Quaritch (Stephen Lang) is also back and out for revenge, but there’s a personal catch for him; he has a son ! Sully and his family ironically raised the abandoned offspring of Quaritch (Jack Champion), and his paternal relationship, as much as he tries to fight it, plays a key role in character development throughout the sequel.

Avatar: The Waterway Key Art And Stills

Source: Courtesy / 20th Century Studios

Kate Winslet as Ronal is captivating. Sam Worthington continues to shine as male lead Jake Sully. You’ll be amazed at how Sigourney Weaver captures the youthfulness of teenage empath Kiri — she voices the hybrid daughter of her own character from the first film. Jamie Flatters, Britain Dalton, and Trinity Jo-Li Bliss each give stellar performances as Na’vi siblings Neteyam, Lo’ak, and young Tuk, respectively.

That said, it feels like a slight cultural disconnect to see white actors playing the indigenous Na’vi people with features, hair textures, and dialects synonymous with African and Native American cultures. For context, Worthington’s Sully rocks a full head of dreadlocks for the duration of the film. You’ll also spot a literal sea of ​​rocking cornrows, box braids, and other protective African Na’vi-inspired hairstyles. We won’t go so far as to call it cosplay, especially since the Na’vi are a fictional race with no real-life rules, but cultural moments in time like this deserve proper representation. Fortunately, the cultural confusion is balanced with the other half of the main cast, including the return of Zoe Saldaña as female lead Neytiri, a powerful performance by Cliff Curtis as male co-lead Tonowari, returning CCH Pounder as the wise and witty Mo’à, newcomer Bailey Bass as young beauty Reya, Filip Geljo as Aonung, and Duane Evans Jr. as Rotxo.

Stephen Lang’s incredible performance as Colonel Miles Quaritch stands on its own; his MAGA-style buzzcut continues even in Avatar form, and at every step of how you see him as a hyper-masculine white guy with misplaced aggression. Yeah, this type!

Avatar: The Waterway Key Art And Stills

Source: Courtesy / 20th Century Studios

Avatar: The Waterway Key Art And Stills

Source: Courtesy / 20th Century Studios

The ongoing love story between Neytiri and Sully, woven into the family dynamics of raising biological and adopted children, is probably more beautiful to behold than the graphics themselves, as exceptional as they are. You feel their passion, their pain, their grief, their anger and above all their pride in being Na’vi in ​​every scene. Saldaña fans will immediately notice his signature raucous rage, as seen in more emotional roles, during one of the most pivotal scenes in the film’s climax. The pain and aggression, even madness, when you see what happens is both heartbreaking and understandable, while praising his revenge tactics.

Avatar: The Waterway Key Art And Stills

Source: Courtesy / 20th Century Studios

Overall, the film captured an array of emotions that are sure to soothe all types of moviegoers. Whether it’s learning about the habits and way of life of the underwater expert Metkayina tribe, or seeing how family and love are among the strongest bonds in human life and/or or humanoid, Avatar 2 is emerging as a strong contender for movie of the decade.

Let’s see if it matches the success of its predecessor. We’re going to go out on a limb and say he most definitely will.

look Avatar: The Way of the Water right now at a theater near you. Watch the trailer below:

Review: ‘Avatar: The Way Of Water’ Was Definitely Worth The 12 Year Wait Was Originally Posted On blackamericaweb.com

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